Steroids: A Holistic Approach

steroids a holistic approach boulder holistic vet angie krause

If you are like many of my clients, you want to avoid steroids for you pet. As a holistic veterinarian, I also want to avoid steroids for my patients; however, there is a time and a place for the judicious use of steroids in cats and dogs. In this article I am going to outline the benefits and risks of steroids to help you make an informed decision for your pet

First let’s start with the benefits:

Steroids can be a magic bullet for certain inflammatory conditions. When we can help decrease swelling and inflammation, we can help the body heal more quickly. Here are examples of conditions that I treat with steroids.

  • Ear infections – I recommend using topical steroids. However, if the ear canal is too swollen for application of ointment, I will use 1-2 doses of a low dose steroid. It is magic! I also use a steroid combined with an enzyme to to help prevent ear infections in dogs that have had chronic ear infections.

Holistic Health Tip – If your dog or cat suffers from chronic ear infections, they may have a food allergy or sensitivity. Investigate their diet and consider removing grain, corn, soy and gluten. Other common allergens are chicken, beef, and fish.

  • Intervertebral Disc Disease (IVDD) – Many veterinarians use non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs) such as Rimadyl instead of steroids. In my 10 years of practice, I have found that steroids are far superior in controlling symptoms and helping regain mobility.
  • Autoimmune Disease – This is when steroids are non-negotiable. Autoimmune diseases occur when your pet’s immune system attacks the body. These are often life threatening and require steroids and other immunosuppressants for survival. The most common forms of autoimmune disease in dogs are immune mediated thrombocytopenia (IMT), immune mediated hemolytic anemia (IMHA) and lupus. Autoimmune diseases in cats are less common.
  • Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) in cats – This disease often causes vomiting, diarrhea, and weight loss. In less severe cases, we can manage the disease using diet and supplements alone. However, in very severe cases, steroids are needed to manage symptoms. I just recently started my own kitty on steroids. I tried using diet, supplements and herbs with no success. He has lost half of his body weight and would have wasted away without medical intervention.
  • Allergic Reactions – If your pet is having an allergic reaction, steroids and antihistamines may be life saving.

Now let’s talk about the downside of steroids:

It is important to understand that if your pet needs to take a short or even a long course of steroids, the side effects are reversible. This is worth repeating. The side effects of steroids are reversible.

This is why I don’t worry about short courses of small doses and you shouldn’t worry either.

Here are all the reasons why we want to avoid steroids.

  • Your dog might pee in the house – Steroids cause both cats and dogs to drink more and urinate more. It is really important that while on steroids you give your pet access to fresh water at all times. This will help protect their kidneys.
  • Increased appetite – For some animals, steroids can cause a voracious appetite. This is dose dependent and is different for every animal.
  • Behavior changes – Some animals can become cranky, aggressive, or even lethargic on steroids.
  • Stomach/intestinal ulcers – This can be prevented by using antacids to help protect the lining of the stomach and intestines. If your veterinarian prescribes steroids, talk to them about ulcer prevention.
  • Damaging gut flora – Steroids can cause an imbalance in the bacteria in the gut and lead to digestive problems.
  • Long term side effects – This is when things really get ugly. Unless your dog has an autoimmune disease, it’s best to avoid long term steroid use. Thinning of skin, damage to the liver, loss of muscle, loss of hair, immune system suppression, and weakening of ligaments are just a few of the most common side effect of long term steroids. Also, long term use of steroids can cause diabetes mellitus in cats. If caught early this is can be reversible. Some pets require long term use of steroids. Work with your veterinarian to find the lowest dose possible, while still controlling symptoms.

What to do if your pet needs to be on steroids:

If your pet has been on a course of steroids here is a protocol that you can use to help support their body afterwards. I use this protocol for a month after using steroids.

  • Repopulate the gut with healthy bacteria – You can achieve this by using over the counter probiotics or by making fermented foods. If your pet has been on steroids, I recommend using both for maximum effect. Culturelle makes single strain probiotics that are not cultured on dairy. 
  • Provide liver support with milk thistle – Steroids are taxing on the liver. Good news, the liver is a master at rejuvenation! I like to use Hepatosupport by Rx Vitamins for Pets. This is a great supplement to use regularly.
  • Repair the gut with Bone/Meat Broth – The collagen found in broth is an excellent way to help repair the gut after a round of steroids. Broth is also very mineral rich. Click here for my chicken broth recipe for cats and dogs.
  • Support detoxification with regular exercise – Increased blood and lymphatic circulation can help your pet flush out metabolic waste. I recommend daily leash walking for dogs (and cats if you have worked that out). Chances are walking on a leash is not your cat’s cup of tea. Check out these food puzzles to help get your kitty moving.

Here are a few parting tips about steroids:

  • If your pet needs a short dose of steroids, it is not the end of the world.
  • Make sure you never give drugs like Rimadyl while giving steroids.
  • Work with your vet to use the smallest dose of steroid for the shortest amount of time. Sometimes a whisper dose of steroids can be immensely helpful.
  • Remember to follow a course of steroids with the protocol I listed above
  • Never stop steroids without your veterinarian’s instruction.

Has your pet ever taken steroids? Tell me about it in the comments below. Remember, you are doing a great job and your pet is lucky to have you!

With love,

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Claire Primo, Veterinary Nurse for BHVLaura B MastrangeloCherieDr. Angie Krause, DVMChristina Bourne Recent comment authors
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Becky McEnerney
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Becky McEnerney

My cat never had symptoms of IBD and it was found on an ultrasound because she has lung issues. Endoscopy was performed as well as biopsies where it was determined she did in fact have IBD. Long story short, shortly after starting predniselone, enduring ravenous appetite and hanging over the water bowl for hours, a bladder infection ensued. Had to be on antibiotics for 21 days, with massive diarrhea the entire time. I requested to change her to budesonide as my other 2 IBS kitties tolerated it well. The ravenous hunger and thirst subsided. Yeah!! Now 2 months later she… Read more »

Dr. Angie Krause, DVM

Hi Becky!

This is an excellent point! If the CBD product you are using reports the amount of CBD in percentage, you must first convert the percentage of CBD into milligrams of CBD. Percentage of concentration is equal to grams/100 mls. For example if you had a 20% solution, you would have 20 grams of CBD per 100 mls. This would need to be converted to milligrams per milliliter. There are 1000 mg in 1 gram. Brings me back to college chemistry!

Amanda
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Amanda

What supportive steps should be taken for a cat that needs to be on steroids due to an immune mediated condition?

Dr. Angie Krause, DVM

Hi Amanda,

Steroids can be absolutely life saving for cats with immune mediated disease. My own kitty is on steroids everyday. I like to use supplements that will help support the gut lining. Probiotics are a great place to start. I really like this new Thorne probiotic. Other gut supporting herbal blends like Nutrigest can also be helpful. Feeding a low carbohydrate diet is imperative.

Keep us updated on your sweet kitty!

Dr. Angie

Amanda
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Amanda

Thank you! We are not sure yet if Hank’s condition is auto immune but that is the current ‘most likely’ thinking.

First we are dealing with a secondary infection of his nail beds (several toes) and then we will dig deeper to find out the root cause. Speaking of which, I assume probiotics are definitely necessary after antibiotics, anything else? Milk thistle? Anything for kidney support?

Claire Primo, Veterinary Nurse for BHV

Hi Amanda,

Milk thistle is great!

For kidney support, we often use RxRenal. Subcutaneous fluids can be greatly helpful, and as much hydration as possible. Here is a blog that Dr. Angie wrote all about holistic treatment of Chronic Kidney Disease in Cats. Hope it helps!

Warmly,
Claire

Amanda
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Amanda

Oh and he is already 99% raw fed. His current food (he is extremely finicky) even has raw goat’s milk.

Christina Bourne
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Christina Bourne

My 14 yo male cat has suffered from IBS for 7 years. It has been up and down on steroids and off steroids. He developed what the vet said was asthma during this time. 2 late spring/early summers in a row he has a huge flair up and he was given a rabies shot both summers. Last year he had a kidney infection and supposedly pneumonia, spent a week in the hospital and came home on Science Diet ID canned, Cerenia and Famotidine plus fluids. During that time he had very inflamed lymph nodes. We opted for not biopsying because… Read more »

Dr. Angie Krause, DVM

Hi Christina,

I am so sorry to hear that your boy has been going through such a hard time recently. I know this probably feels so overwhelming.

It’s so hard to know what the masses may be without biopsy.

Have you read Dr. Angie’s blog discussing IBD in kitties? Here is Part 1, and here is Part 2. It has a wealth of information, that may also be helpful!

I hope this helps. Big hugs to you and your kitty!

Warmly,
Claire

Cherie
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Cherie

My 2 sister Lhasa’s have been prescribed Temaril P. They are suffering from auto immune problems due to their 1st rabies and unfortunately before I was aware the problem was rabies vaccine, they received a 2nd vaccine a year later. Vaccinois was diagnosed and 1 now has hypothyroidism from this. They have extreme environmental allergies since 4 months after the 1st rabies. March – November is the worse time of the year. Complete hair loss, eye and nose discharge, blackened elephant skin, ear infections, skin yeast and bacterial infections. I hate that I have to use drugs on them at… Read more »

Laura B Mastrangelo
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Laura B Mastrangelo

Hello and thanks for all this information. I am fostering a cat that has IBD. We are trying everything. He was doing better although since he didn’t want to eat the vet advised us to give whatever he wanted. We tried a variety of very good food that he wouldn’t eat. Recently he was doing much better with his diarrhea and my vet advised us to give prendisolone 5 mg twice a day. The third day he developed a terrible diarrhea and my vet is on vacation. Is it possible it was too much prednisolone? Can I try to lower… Read more »

Claire Primo, Veterinary Nurse for BHV

Hi Laura,

IBD can be so overwhelming and frustrating!

Have you read Dr. Angie’s blog discussing her approach to IBD? It’s a long one, so it’s separated into two parts. Here is part 1 and here is part 2. There is so much good information in these that I think may be helpful!

As far as how much Prednisolone to give, I would keep working with your veterinarian on this. I know that they were on vacation, but have you been able to connect with the clinic to get more information?

You are doing a great job!

Warmly,
Claire

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